The Pettit Family 1823 - 2002

Emily Pettitt b 1833 - d

Daughter - Elizabeth Daughter - Lucy
Census Year Copy Found Certificate Type Copy Found Associated Locations  
1841 Yes

Birth

No

Place of birth (No map yet)
1851 No

Marriage

No

Place of marriage
1861 Yes

Death

No

Residence
1871 No        
1881 No        
1891 No        
1901 No        

 

 

 

 

 

Research Dates
25 Jul 06       

25 July 2006
Emily is another of the mysterious family members.   She appears in the 1841 census, which is the record in which she was first found, aged 8.   It is assumed that she is the youngest daughter of  William and Lucy Pettitt, although this is unconfirmed as the census does not show any relationship to the head of the household as subsequent census records do.   The 1851 cannot provide that relationship link, as she cannot be found in it; she does not appear with the rest of the family.   At the time of the 1851 census she would have been aged 17 or 18, so there is a very strong possibility that she was working away from home.   A trawl of the census will be carried out in more depth to establish her whereabouts.

The 1861 census does find Emily, sadly she is in the Union Workhouse at Nacton.   The census shows that she is the mother to illegitimate twin daughters, born in Wickham Market around 1860.   The reason for the place of birth is unclear.   To date, no birth certificates for Elizabeth and Lucy have been found, so no clues can be seen on any official documents.   The next document on which Emily appears is the death certificate for one of her daughters, Lucy, who died in the workhouse aged 2.   The trail for Emily goes cold at this point, I cannot find her in any records past the date of this death certificate.   When time allows, a concerted effort will be made to try and reveal more about Emily.

1861 Census

One of the saddest entries that I have yet made, the story of Emily rivals that of her niece, Susannah. This census finds her in the workhouse at Nacton, a place that the family are no strangers to. In fact, of her immediate family, sisters Elizabeth had a son called William in the workhouse in 1844, some 16 years before Emily; Jane had an illegitimate daughter, also called Jane, but not in the workhouse; and Lucy and brother George may have had children before or very close to the marriage of their respective partners, though again not in the workhouse.

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